Lose the Lectern

Thoughts On Presenting And Design

Specifically, with the only available microphone attached to the lectern and no lavalier mics available, the presenters were stuck in one place and were prevented from interacting with the audience. Lisa Braithwaite has a great post where she discusses why you should avoid the lectern if you can. Likely a main reason why people stand behind a lectern, even when they don’t have to, is because of the perception of safety.

Should You Speak Behind a Lectern?

Executive Speech Coach

I suggest you do not use a lectern. Standing away from the lectern exposes your full body to the view of the audience. How Can You Use a Lectern Effectively? The problem is most speakers hide behind lecterns thereby greatly constraining important body language. In that case, a lectern with a light and microphone will help you get through your talk smoothly. Lecterns do make things look official. Judges always hide behind a lectern.) Maybe.

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Using a lectern: do or don't?

Speak Schmeak

Following up on my post about where to put your notes , here's my quick tip about using a lectern: Don't. But using a lectern is problematic for several reasons. It's too tempting to lean on the lectern or grasp its sides for comfort. A lectern is great for holding your notes or hiding your props. What about those times when the only microphone is attached to the lectern? If you must use a lectern, follow these tips: 1.

"How do you wean yourself from the lectern?" 4 ways

The Eloquent Woman

"How do you wean yourself from the lectern?" Leaving the lectern and making a closer connection with the audience was among my recommendations. Lecterns accomplish many things, from providing a platform for your notes and technology to hiding most of you from the audience, useful if you''re in fight-or-flight mode. Return to the lectern and your prepared remarks when you''re done. All of these tactics take practice before your actual talk.

Reviewing those use-or-lose-the-lectern lessons

The Eloquent Woman

This time last year, I was in the middle of the "Step Up Your Speaking" online coaching of Stephanie Benoit, so I thought I'd share again this post on 7 things every speaker should know about when to use--or lose--that lectern. Choosing whether you'll use or lose the lectern is a major factor in adding presence to your presentation. Lecterns have advantages: They're a natural focal point for the audience. Lecterns have disadvantages: They hide you, the speaker.

Week 7: Use-or-lose lectern lessons

The Eloquent Woman

Choosing whether you'll use or lose the lectern is a major factor in adding presence to your presentation. Stephanie's just starting as a speaker, so here are some things to consider and know about lecterns, whether you use them or avoid them: Lecterns are the slanted stands that prop up your speech and hold the microphone. Lecterns have advantages: They're a natural focal point for the audience. Lecterns have disadvantages: They hide you, the speaker.

A Public Speaking Alphabet

Manner of Speaking

L – Lectern. I think that the poor lectern has a bit of a bad rap these days as being a “barrier&# between the speaker and the audience. There are times when it will be perfectly appropriate to use a lectern when speaking. Did the lectern create a barrier between Steve Jobs and his audience in this speech ? Practice getting comfortable both with and without a lectern. P – Preparation and practice. Practice using inflection.

Speakers: It’s About Time (and How to Manage It)

Manner of Speaking

Practice with a timer. a) If you are speaking at a lectern, or have a table to which you will return during the talk (for e xample, to pick up a prop) place your watch on the lectern or table with the face up so that you can quickly check it. (b) Only use a smartphone as a timer if you can place it on a lectern or table. Delivery Preparation audience Keynote lectern Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation public speaking Speech time

2012 219

Make your talk better with practice and memorization

The Eloquent Woman

They gripped them like safety blankets, splayed them on top of tables holding demonstration equipment, occasionally wielded paper alongside an iPad, or propped them up on lecterns and music stands. Madrigal does a useful description of his process for memorizing, and notes something that good coaches know: Practice and memorization will make your talk better over time. From the article: All the live practice began to reshape the talk itself.

2015 71

testing the kindle on the lectern

The Eloquent Woman

In this case, our venue had a nice spotlight trained over the reading surface of the lectern, and it was midday. I'll keep practicing privately and in live settings with Kindle, because I'm excited by the possibilities for speakers. I took the Amazon Kindle out for a test-drive in a real speaking engagement last month, when I moderated the annual media roundtable--a panel of three reporters--for Washington Women in Public Relations.

5 tips from speakers on getting past practice to great delivery

The Eloquent Woman

If you've been reading this blog for any length of time, you know I always recommend practice, and lots of it. But for many speakers, moving from practice to a seemingly effortless delivery is the biggest leap of all. I think it pays to remember the Great Irony of Public Speaking: It's the speakers who practice who look as if they are speaking without effort, and those who wing it risk looking unprepared and inartful.

2015 76

Speakers: It’s About Time (and How to Manage It)

Manner of Speaking

Practice with a timer. a) If you are speaking at a lectern, or have a table to which you will return during the talk (for e xample, to pick up a prop) place your watch on the lectern or table with the face up so that you can quickly check it. (b) Only use a smartphone as a timer if you can place it on a lectern or table. Delivery Preparation audience Keynote lectern Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation public speaking Speech time

2012 151

What does it mean to practice your speech? 8 good options for speakers

The Eloquent Woman

I have read my slides, therefore I have practiced. -- René Descartes Descartes didn''t quite say that, but you say it all the time. I practiced," you''ll tell me. That''s because, as a Washington, DC-based speaker coach and presentation trainer, I''ve heard every dodge in the book about whether and when you practiced your talk, speech, or presentation. None of that equals practicing your speech, in my book. Eventually, try practicing out loud without the cue cards.

2013 79

practices for panelists: 7 paths to success

The Eloquent Woman

What's the panel setup--table with microphones or each of us taking a turn at the lectern? Related posts: 4 stepping stones to get speaking practice (including panels) Everything in moderation (for panel moderators) 5 ways to renew your speaking skills Speakers: 7 reasons I want you to talk more. Speaking as part of a panel is a great opportunity to speak without the full responsibility for holding an audience's attention.a

Step away from the Podium

Green Room Speakers

In this week's NYT, Michael Shear and Ashley Parker describe how Mitt Romney's speaking got much better once he stepped away from the lecturn: When Mitt Romney crammed for the Republican presidential debates four years ago, he went all out: The campaign built a stage with four lecterns and used senior staff as stand-ins for his rivals, John McCain and Rudolph W. This month, when Mr. Romney prepared for his seventh debate of the 2012 campaign, at Dartmouth College, there were no lecterns.

the speaker's wish list: practice tools

The Eloquent Woman

Calling someone a "practiced speaker" is a compliment that recognizes the work involved in becoming a smooth, eloquent presenter, interviewee or speaker. But even speakers who invest in training need to spend time practicing on their own. With holidays approaching, here's a wish list for some tools and gadgets that can help you practice on your own to reach specific speaking goals: I need to keep my remarks brief or fit them into a specific amount of time.

2008 40

9 not-to-miss reasons for video practice

The Eloquent Woman

Do you really need video practice to speak well? That seems to be the assumption I've encountered in a couple of recent workshops I've led on communications skills and speaking, where several young women have noted on their feedback forms that they didn't find the video practice useful "because I'll never be on camera in my work." But I'd say to any would-be speaker: Take any opportunity you can to practice on video, even if it's on your own.

5 Tips on Presenting Like A Real Human

Can You Hear Me Up the Back?

Barack Obama is human, Kevin Rudd… well, you can practically hear the whirring of the tiny servo-motors and sophisticated vocal synthesis circuits that make his performances so reasonably human-like. Leave The Lectern. Lecterns block all of that from view, leaving you as just a head poking up out of a box. If you want to come across as more human, loosen that death-grip on the lectern and come out where they can see you.

2009 40

8 scary ways to be a better speaker

The Eloquent Woman

I can tell, because I see speakers scared into the safe mode of speaking all the time , staying behind the lectern, using slides to advance their content, and limiting time for questions. Yes, get out from behind that lectern, even if you stand to one side of it and rest an arm on it. Instead, practice getting comfortable saying variations on “I don’t know” – even an “I wish I knew that answer to that, but I think we may never find out” will do. Speaking can be scary.

2010 50

Tip or treat: October's top 10 tips

The Eloquent Woman

Readers chose the tips and treats they found on this blog in October, and I'm happy to share them with you in this monthly roundup of our most popular posts: Should you use or lose the lectern? The focus of week 7 of our Step Up Your Speaking online coaching included this popular post with 3 video examples of women speakers demonstrating best practices, with or without a lectern. You can see online trainee Stephanie Benoit's thoughts on speakers and lecterns here.

Toastmasters Friday: How Smooth is Your Choreography?

Speak and Deliver

The strong transitions from President to Toastmaster to Evaluator to Speaker, etc, that come from repeated practice. When transitioning from one participant to another in front of the room, work to be consistent in what you do, whether you meet people halfway or make them come to the lectern. Practice made Sexy.probably not for Toastmasters.or But the more we practices our 'moves', the better we're able to handle those unfortunate trips, drops, and splats in our meetings.

2011 67

Tips from my first professional Pecha Kucha

PowerPoint Tips

Then, you need to practice! I probably practiced my presentation about 15 times before I felt comfortable. Most people weren’t experienced presenters and they stood behind a lectern (I think it was actually a music stand) and read their notes. But in general, you should come out from behind the lectern and speak without notes. To get it right, you have to practice many times. What’s that?

2013 158

Presentation delivery tips for the greatest impact

PowerPoint Tips

Practice so that you can take one glance at the slide and then look at the audience to make your point. No lectern: Don’t have a big box between you and the audience. I just did a webinar for the Canadian Association of Communicators in Education called “Presentations that Impact Lives.” ” Near the end, I used a slide that summarized a few points about presentation delivery.

Public speaking gestures: Too many "don'ts"

Speak Schmeak

The suggestions included: Don't stroke your beard, don't push your hair back, don't touch what you're wearing, don't put your hands in your pockets, don't hold them at your waist, don't put them behind you or in front of you, don't lean on the lectern, don't restrict your movements, don't have too many movements, and more. Small movements, big movements, even leaning on the lectern with one elbow for a few seconds while you make a point.

2012 187

Four Tips to Crush Your Fear of Public Speaking

Succeed Speaking

You’re standing on a podium behind a lectern giving a speech to a packed house and you’re hands start shaking ever so slightly. Practice Really Does Make Perfect. If you know you have a big presentation at work or you are the guest speaker at a seminar, the best thing you can do — besides being well-prepared and having your speech memorized — is to practice on family and friends. A Guest Post from Catherine Joyner.

2013 156

2 more high-tech tools for speakers

The Eloquent Woman

This week, I shared an electronic way to nudge yourself to practice speaking. Great as a practice tool if you have particular points you want to reel off without checking notes. Buy the Kindle DX Related posts: Testing the Kindle on the lectern New Kindle offers more features for speakers. Tags: speaker tools practice online resources we like The new year seems full of innovations that you can turn to your advantage as a speaker.

Public speaking gestures: Too many "don'ts"

Speak Schmeak

The suggestions included: Don't stroke your beard, don't push your hair back, don't touch what you're wearing, don't put your hands in your pockets, don't hold them at your waist, don't put them behind you or in front of you, don't lean on the lectern, don't restrict your movements, don't have too many movements, and more. Small movements, big movements, even leaning on the lectern with one elbow for a few seconds while you make a point.

2012 169

ON SPEAKING LIKE A PRO

Sandra Schrift - Executive Speech Coach

Visualize your success at the lectern. Practice, Practice, Practice your speech beforehand. Here are some tips to reduce speech anxiety that I have gleaned from working with professional speakers over the last 24 years. When you visualize your success, you will be successful.' Arrive early and become familiar with the room in which you will give your presentation. Check the audio/visual equipment as needed. Greet your audience as they arrive in the room.

2008 100

50 New Year’s Resolutions for Public Speakers

Manner of Speaking

I will practice. I will speak without using a lectern. Some ideas to help you take your public speaking to the next level in 2012. In no particular order: 1. I will prepare. I will have a clear message. I will be able to distill every speech and every presentation into a single sentence. I will always ask myself: “Why should the audience care about my message?” ” 6. If I cannot answer that question, I will find a new message. Or a new audience.

2011 219

50 New Year’s Resolutions for Public Speakers

Manner of Speaking

I will practice. I will speak without using a lectern. Some ideas to help you take your public speaking to the next level in 2012. In no particular order: 1. I will prepare. I will have a clear message. I will be able to distill every speech and every presentation into a single sentence. I will always ask myself: “Why should the audience care about my message?” ” 6. If I cannot answer that question, I will find a new message. Or a new audience.

2011 217

Want to be a better presenter? – Then don’t copy your colleagues

Inter-Activ Presenting and Influencing

Perhaps they stand away from the lectern and interact directly with you, their audience as if you mattered? You can find lots of practical tips on how to be a better presenter in my new book The Presenter’s Edge which is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle formats. DON’T BE A MONKEY! I write lots of posts about how to be a better presenter or speaker but am continually frustrated that I still see so many poor presentations.

2017 77

50 New Year’s Resolutions for Public Speakers

Manner of Speaking

I will practice. I will speak without using a lectern. Some ideas to help you take your public speaking to the next level in 2012. In no particular order: 1. I will prepare. I will have a clear message. I will be able to distill every speech and every presentation into a single sentence. I will always ask myself: “Why should the audience care about my message?” ” 6. If I cannot answer that question, I will find a new message. Or a new audience.

2011 157

How to Look Authoritative when you Feel Anything But

Speaking about Presenting

stand behind a lectern or as far away as they can from the audience. 13 Best Practice Tips for Effective Presentation Handouts. Having to deliver a presentation to people who are older than you, more important than you, or more expert than you, can make you doubt yourself. To look more credible and authoritative do the opposite of what a person lacking in confidence would do. Typically, they would: compare themselves unfavorably to other people. be shy about meeting people.

2010 186

Are you canned or fresh?

Speak Schmeak

We can talk all day about logistics, like notes or no notes, lectern or no lectern, PowerPoint or no PowerPoint, props or no props. If your content is not based on real, practical solutions and tools, you are wasting their time. They need a speaker who can give them what they need and want in the real world, not in some theoretical universe where your words sounds pretty but have no practical application.

2008 100

How to Look Authoritative when you Feel Anything But

Speaking about Presenting

stand behind a lectern or as far away as they can from the audience. 13 Best Practice Tips for Effective Presentation Handouts. Having to deliver a presentation to people who are older than you, more important than you, or more expert than you, can make you doubt yourself. To look more credible and authoritative do the opposite of what a person lacking in confidence would do. Typically, they would: compare themselves unfavorably to other people. be shy about meeting people.

2010 173

6 great gifts to encourage your favorite speaker

The Eloquent Woman

Help your speaker practice and promote her talks with a Sony Bloggie Touch , the same ultralight camcorder I use in group training workshops for speakers. She can plug it into a laptop to watch her practice sessions, project the video, and later, when the final result is recorded, share it to social media sites and via email. Give your speaker a practice advantage with a portable presentation lectern.

2013 74

Presentation Barriers: Physical

Professionally Speaking...

I wrote here about best practices for using a teleprompter. Using a podium or lectern cuts off 50 plus per cent of most people's bodies. Barriers are helpful between skin and sun or between deer and freshly planted flowers. Barriers are a hindrance between speaker and audience. We have enough challenges in engaging an audience without imposing a physical element that our message needs to travel through.

2010 117

Go Ahead … Read Your Speech!

Successful Speeches Blog

If you format your paper correctly (using only the top quarter of the page with your speech on a lectern), your eyes will not travel far down the page. The same as anyone else would … through instruction and practice. If you format your paper correctly (using only the top quarter of the page with your speech on a lectern), your eyes will not travel far down the page. through instruction and practice.

2009 109

Analysis of a Speech by Phil Davison

Manner of Speaking

2: If you must refer to extensive notes, you are probably better off staying behind th e lectern. Practice the speech often, including moving with purpose. The video below has be en spreading like wildfire on the Internet. It is a short speech by Phil Davison, a Republican ca ndidate for the position of Treasurer in Stark County, Ohio. Davison’s speech, which was given to about 100 people, is, to say the least, memorable.

How to manage feedback from the presentation backchannel

Speaking about Presenting

She was initially rattled by the set-up: a flat lectern, a Twitterstream displayed on the screen behind her, and bright lights blinding her. For example, say you’ve planned your presentation to first cover background and then get into practical details – it may be that you fast forward to the second part of your presentation.

Learn Public Speaking Material Easily Using Bits

Great Public Speaking

Since you won't be tied to a lectern or forced to hold notes, you can get physically closer to the audience, or actually enter the audience on occasion. It's tough to find a spare hour or day to practice a full public speaking presentation. Bits can be practiced when you have a few minutes here and there. You will be more likely to practice your material (and we all need practice) if you can practice a three or five-minute chunk rather than the whole presentation.

The sushi of speaking: 7 bite-sized ideas to get you speech-ready

The Eloquent Woman

Practice your opener several times, so that you can do it without referring to your notes and make early eye contact with the audience. You want to be able to stand in a relaxed stance, without swaying or hanging on to the lectern, to look most authoritative--and to keep attention on your words. Bring a funny picture, child's drawing, or photo that only you can see at the lectern to start your speech with a welcoming face.

2011 67

Public Speaking - I Can't Heeeeere You!

Great Public Speaking

It takes practice to do it smoothly. If you are at a lectern, you should know how far your lips need to be from the microphone. When using a handheld or lectern microphone be very careful in pronouncing words that have the letter "p" in them. If the microphone is fixed on the lectern, you can de-emphasize the word with the "p" or turn your head slightly away from the microphone. Although this may seem obvious, make sure the audience can clearly hear every word you say.