Being There

Manner of Speaking

You should always arrive at the venue with plenty of time before your talk so that you can make sure everything is set up and working the way it should. Make Eye Contact. Always make eye contact with the members of your audience. Tags: Delivery Preparation bananas eye contact David Bader Social Contract rest arrive early Being There cotton mouth David Bader has a wonderful quote that public speakers should take to heart: “Be here now.

2010 152

PRESENTATION MANNERS

Professionally Speaking...

Any complaints you have about the venue, logistics, support you've received or equipment should not be shared with the audience. LOOK 'EM IN THE EYES. In a presentation, too often the speaker speaks to the screen behind him or keeps his eyes focused on his notes. This lack of eye contact is off-putting for an audience, as it communicates that you either aren't very interested in them or you didn't think them important enough to be well prepared.

2009 100
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Presentation tips for PowerPoint

Craig Strachan - Keep Talking!

Arrive at the venue early. If it’s a really important presentation, try to get there the day before as well so that you can check out the venue and ensure that all equipment is working. This prevents you from making eye contact with the audience, and prevents them from hearing you. This is an extract of a training session that I present “Putting the POWER back into PowerPoint”. Nowadays, many of us use PowerPoint for our presentations.

2017 109

Being There, Before You’re There

Manner of Speaking

Recently, João posted photos of the speaking venue at the upcoming conference on the District 59 Spring Conference Facebook Page. Seasoned public speakers understand the importance of being familiar with the speaking venue prior to the actual event. But in today’s world of long-distance travel, we often do not get to visit the venue until the day (or even a few hours) before. Eye contact will be important.

2011 188

Public Speaking Best Practices from My Clients

DeFinis Communications

All of the people I spoke with give presentations to a range of audiences and venues, including all hands meetings, staff meetings, department meetings, executive briefings, board presentations, customer presentations and large national and international conferences. I love using the delivery techniques I learned—the gestures, posture, eye contact, slowing down and pausing.”. “I’m

Use the Power of Practice to Build Your Speaking Skills

DeFinis Communications

During these practice sessions, ask people to comment on specific things you want to improve, such as vocal skills, gestures, eye contact, etc. When you practice in a variety of venues and ways, the key skills you want to improve will become more natural and a part of who you are. The psychologist and philosopher William James famously wrote: “99% of our activity is purely automatic; all of our life is nothing but a mass of habits.”

Rate Your Public Speaking Comfort Level

DeFinis Communications

As a result of their lack of preparation, they “hurry” through their presentation, talking too fast, shifting their weight, avoiding eye contact, and showing other physical signs of discomfort. The good news for these speakers is that they already know how to be comfortable in front of one type of audience, so it’s just a matter of learning how to apply their skills to a new venue to be comfortable in every new situation they encounter.

2013 172

Rate Your Public Speaking Comfort Level

DeFinis Communications

As a result of their lack of preparation, they “hurry” through their presentation, talking too fast, shifting their weight, avoiding eye contact, and showing other physical signs of discomfort. The good news for these speakers is that they already know how to be comfortable in front of one type of audience, so it’s just a matter of learning how to apply their skills to a new venue to be comfortable in every new situation they encounter.

2013 130

"Michelangelos" - Titan Brings Ceiling Ads To MBTA Trains, Buses

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

When stuck on the subway or bus and determined to avoid eye contact with fellow riders, we tend to stay looking up.   This new venue for ads can unleash fresh promotional campaigns for those doing the advertising. Yes, we look up. That's what the Titan Advertising Agency in the Boston area knows. For its long-term client the MBTA, Titan is piloting the placement of ads on the ceilings of trains and buses. The experiment is called "Michelangelos."

2014 50

Presentations Sitting Down

Professionally Speaking...

I hadn't thought much about the venue or where at the table I would sit [shame on me] because these are all colleagues whom I meet with monthly. I didn't and was constantly swiveling from side to side in an effort to make frequent eye contact with everyone up and down the expanse of table. Sitting down is fine when you're working at a computer, eating a meal or relaxing with a good book. Sitting down is not so fine when you're giving a presentation.

2010 146

Dog Leash - Multi-Purpose Networking Tool

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

We make eye contact. Another amazing networking venue is the store for our four-footers' supplies. The secret to leveraging walking your dog as a multi-purpose networking tool is the same as in real estate: Location, location, location.    But that doesn't necessarily mean an ultra upscale location where you meet the movers and shakers. It means where you can present yourself easily as a relaxed, confident, and successful professional.

2014 53

PRESENTATION TIP: USE NOTES

Professionally Speaking...

That depends on the kind of presentation, your own personal style, and to a lesser extent, the physical venue. Break eye contact with the audience, glance at your notes and absorb the next point, then re-establish eye contact with the audience and deliver that section. When I teach presentation skills classes, I frequently get asked the question, "Should I use notes in my presentation?" [ Said in a tone of voice that assumes the correct answer is no ].

2009 112

Lost in Translation – Ten Tips for Working with Interpreters

Manner of Speaking

Make sure that the technician remains at the venue in case problems arise. I tell the interpreters with whom I work that if I make eye contact with them, they should give me a quick signal (agreed beforeh and) to let me know whether everything is OK, whether I should slow down, whether I should speak louder, etc. Lost in Translation is a terrific film that received critical acclaim when it was released in 2003.

2012 219

Avoid Energy Zappers

Humor Power

Eye contact. Lack of good eye contact is an energy zapper. Great eye contact gives you a presence and a connection with the audience that is critical to your success. Great eye contact completes the conversation loop. Lack of eye contact drains energy from your presentation. The venue. It was not an ideal humor venue. If you have a part in selecting the venue, make good choices.

Venue 55

Are you making these rookie mistakes?

Speak Schmeak

Not only does this freeze your movement in place or, if you do move around the stage, force you to return to the keyboard every time you want to advance to the next slide, it restricts your eye contact and inhibits gestures. However, if you have purchased a presentation remote ( this one is my favorite) or are using one offered by the venue, then you need to practice with it before your presentation. There's nothing wrong with being an inexperienced speaker.

2011 157

Stand or sit, and why does it matter?

Speak Schmeak

At conference tables, on panels, and in other small venues, it can be considered awkward to stand when speaking. It gives you authority, it helps the audience pay better attention, and your eye contact and body language are more accessible to the group. Are you on a raised stage, or are you at eye level with the audience? When we think of public speaking, the traditional image that comes to mind is a person standing in the front of a room full of people.

2012 156

Is PowerPoint the new black?

Speak Schmeak

Other visuals might include props, toys, posters, videos or costumes, depending on the venue and the audience. Looking down at the keyboard every couple of minutes inhibits eye contact with the audience, and you're less likely to move around the stage if you have to come back for that key. Your physical presence, movement, voice, eye contact and energy are critical to keeping the audience's attention -- whether or not you use PowerPoint.

Are you making these rookie mistakes?

Speak Schmeak

Not only does this freeze your movement in place or, if you do move around the stage, force you to return to the keyboard every time you want to advance to the next slide, it restricts your eye contact and inhibits gestures. However, if you have purchased a presentation remote ( this one is my favorite) or are using one offered by the venue, then you need to practice with it before your presentation. There's nothing wrong with being an inexperienced speaker.

2011 109

Ann Medlock's "near-TED" experience

The Eloquent Woman

Even better, she describes how it felt to go through the talk, including: how it feels to speak in such a large venue that you can't relate to the audience with eye contact (too many lights, size of room); how she planned and actually executed her speech; what she did to compensate for a last-minute equipment change (yes, that even happens at TED); how she compared herself to the speakers before and after.

Venue 43

Do it with the lights on

Speak Schmeak

Today I'm going to talk about the general organization of the event, the venue and some technical issues. But in this venue, the screen was fixed, so there was no other option. If you do end up speaking in a venue where the screen is portable, I recommend asking the organizers to move the screen into the corner to your left and put you in the center of the stage. There's no eye contact. I spent Saturday morning attending the first Santa Barbara area TEDx event.

2010 100

Do it with the lights on: TEDxSB Part 1

Speak Schmeak

Today I'm going to talk about the general organization of the event, the venue and some technical issues. But in this venue, the screen was fixed, so there was no other option. If you do end up speaking in a venue where the screen is portable, I recommend asking the organizers to move the screen into the corner to your left and put you in the center of the stage. There's no eye contact. I spent Saturday morning attending the first Santa Barbara area TEDx event.

2010 100

June 12for12 Challenge: Prepare Your Mind

Speak Schmeak

Last month, we talked about the external aspects of presentation preparation, the nuts and bolts of organizing your thoughts into congruent and cohesive content, preparing your materials and adjusting your venue. You stand tall, you make eye contact, you smile, you own the room. Have you joined my 12 Speaking Challenges for 2012 program yet?

Stand or sit, and why does it matter?

Speak Schmeak

At conference tables, on panels, and in other small venues, it can be considered awkward to stand when speaking. It gives you authority, it helps the audience pay better attention, and your eye contact and body language are more accessible to the group. Are you on a raised stage, or are you at eye level with the audience? When we think of public speaking, the traditional image that comes to mind is a person standing in the front of a room full of people.

2012 100

The Power of the Sermon

Green Room Speakers

Focused eye contact and clarity of purpose and message are just a few of the ways the a spiritual leader can connect personally with individuals in the congregation. Posted by Sarah Gershman at 8:13 PM Labels: connection , eye contact , one-on-one conversation 3comments: Anonymoussaid. I agree, it's all about the personal connection, even in large venues. Sunday, September 12, 2010 The Power of the Sermon What is the real power of a sermon?

Power 43

June 12for12 Challenge: Prepare Your Mind

Speak Schmeak

Last month, we talked about the external aspects of presentation preparation, the nuts and bolts of organizing your thoughts into congruent and cohesive content, preparing your materials and adjusting your venue. You stand tall, you make eye contact, you smile, you own the room. Have you joined my 12 Speaking Challenges for 2012 program yet?

Bridging the Gap

Can You Hear Me Up the Back?

We all know how important nonverbal communication is to presentations - facial expressions, tone, eye contact and so forth. Once the seats are filled, get the venue staff to add a few more at the back. This one is as much for meeting managers as it is for presenters, because the distance between stage and audience is usually out of the control of the speaker.

Effective public speaking: audience contact

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

The following are effective tips to preserve that necessary contact with the audience. Greet them Minutes before your actual speaking engagement, you could circle around the venue and establish yourself with the people who will be listening to you. Establish eye contact Connect with your audience, appear natural. This is also a good time to establish eye contact with your attendees as well as to catch that much needed breathe.

Sussing out your speaker space: A checklist

The Eloquent Woman

Can I move around that arrangement for better eye contact and engagement? If there's piped-in music (this happens in restaurants and other venues), can it be turned off? Emily Culbertson posed this question some time ago: What should you know about the room in which you're speaking? The room--especially its technology--is one of the six sets of questions in my checklist to prepare the whole speaker.

Speaking with Authentic Authenticity

Speak and Deliver

Earlier this week, I spoke about Audiences with X-Ray Eyes & Ears , and the dangers of speaking on a topic you dont believe in. Instead, start by making eye contact. Another tip for your readers is to arrive at the speaking venue early and try to meet some of the people who will be in the audience. Audiences have X-Ray Eyes & Ears ► September (8) Speaking Season - 37 of 37?

2010 58

Dear Speakers - James Duncan Davidson - James Duncan Davidson

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

Photos ( Zenfolio | Flickr ) Archives About Contact Dear Speakers By James Duncan Davidson on March 8, 2009 12:22 AM | 71 Comments Tagged: advice, speaking Last week, while shooting eComm 2009 in Burlingame, I started posting a set of thoughts on Twitter, all starting out Dear Speaker. If you dont make eye contact with your audience, you make it that much harder for them to connect to your message.

2009 36

All About Presentations: Checklist for Presentations

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

Dont rehearse while going to the venue. Get Smart Get Wireless Learn to Forget PowerPoint If Required Website Review: TemplatesWise.com Making Good Consult Presentations - Part II How do you make eye contact with the audience? skip to main | skip to sidebar Jan 14, 2009 Checklist for Presentations You are going to make a presentation in your office or to a client. To a small group or a large audience. Here is a small checklist to help you improve your presentation.

20 tips for better conference speaking ~ Authentic Boredom

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

Keeping the audience eyes’ on you rather than their laptops benefits both you and the audience. Make eye contact. I might use it at a home venue where I know it works. 20 tips for better conference speaking ~ 16 February 2009 ~ View from on stage as I’m preparing to speak at An Event Apart New Orleans 2008. I’ll be straight up with you: I don’t profess to be an expert speaker.

2009 52

How to Present While People are Twittering | Pistachio

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

In the News Valley View Ventures Signs Pistachio Consulting Multimedia Gallery Portraits Speaking Candids Calendar ABOUT US Laura’s Blog Team Join Us Accounting RFP Clients and Disclosures CONTACT US Enterprise Contact Thank You Your Needs Just One Question What Does Twitter Disrupt? We’re used to having eye contact with our audience and using that eye contact and audience reaction to measure how well we’re engaging the audience.

How to Start Speaking at Events | chrisbrogan.com

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

chrisbrogan.com Home About Speaking Rockstars Newsletters Contact Best Of How to Start Speaking at Events December 8, 2008 · Comments One day, I wasn’t a speaker at conferences, and then I was. And finally, I give people an email address where to contact me. Apolinaras "Apollo" Sinkevicius chrisbrogan @Ricardo - here's how I approach speaking proposals: I write them so compelling that the person HAS to contact me, even if they don't want to use me for the show.

2009 50