"How do you wean yourself from the lectern?" 4 ways

The Eloquent Woman

"How do you wean yourself from the lectern?" Leaving the lectern and making a closer connection with the audience was among my recommendations. Lecterns accomplish many things, from providing a platform for your notes and technology to hiding most of you from the audience, useful if you''re in fight-or-flight mode. It''s far easier to sense audience reactions, make eye contact and engage the audience if you''re liberated from behind the bench, so to speak.

Reviewing those use-or-lose-the-lectern lessons

The Eloquent Woman

This time last year, I was in the middle of the "Step Up Your Speaking" online coaching of Stephanie Benoit, so I thought I'd share again this post on 7 things every speaker should know about when to use--or lose--that lectern. Choosing whether you'll use or lose the lectern is a major factor in adding presence to your presentation. Lecterns have advantages: They're a natural focal point for the audience. Lecterns have disadvantages: They hide you, the speaker.

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Week 7: Use-or-lose lectern lessons

The Eloquent Woman

Choosing whether you'll use or lose the lectern is a major factor in adding presence to your presentation. Stephanie's just starting as a speaker, so here are some things to consider and know about lecterns, whether you use them or avoid them: Lecterns are the slanted stands that prop up your speech and hold the microphone. Lecterns have advantages: They're a natural focal point for the audience. Lecterns have disadvantages: They hide you, the speaker.

A Public Speaking Alphabet

Manner of Speaking

L – Lectern. I think that the poor lectern has a bit of a bad rap these days as being a “barrier&# between the speaker and the audience. There are times when it will be perfectly appropriate to use a lectern when speaking. Did the lectern create a barrier between Steve Jobs and his audience in this speech ? Practice getting comfortable both with and without a lectern. A - Audience. Fitting that it comes first. The most important part of any speech.

‘Mature, grown-up and statesmanlike’ Cameron at the lectern

Max Atkinson

So David Cameron did stay at the lectern for his big speech - and won the instant accolade of being ‘mature, grown-up and statesmanlike’ in one of the interviews with the party faithful a few seconds after he’d finished. In fact, it was a rather unusual form of ‘skewed’ eye-contact.

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Presentation delivery tips for the greatest impact

PowerPoint Tips

No lectern: Don’t have a big box between you and the audience. Eye contact: Make eye contact with people as you speak; don’t look over the heads of the audience. I just did a webinar for the Canadian Association of Communicators in Education called “Presentations that Impact Lives.” ” Near the end, I used a slide that summarized a few points about presentation delivery.

Tip or treat: October's top 10 tips

The Eloquent Woman

Readers chose the tips and treats they found on this blog in October, and I'm happy to share them with you in this monthly roundup of our most popular posts: Should you use or lose the lectern? The focus of week 7 of our Step Up Your Speaking online coaching included this popular post with 3 video examples of women speakers demonstrating best practices, with or without a lectern. You can see online trainee Stephanie Benoit's thoughts on speakers and lecterns here.

Analysis of a Speech by Kate Middleton

Manner of Speaking

She made good eye contact. And she didn’t seem at all uncomfortable with the eye contact, which is a very encouraging sign. Also, she will not alway s feel compelled to stand behind the lectern. Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, has given her first public speech since becoming a Royal. She did it at the opening of the Treehouse Children’s Hospice for sick children in Ipswich, E ngland.

How to Look Authoritative when you Feel Anything But

Speaking about Presenting

stand behind a lectern or as far away as they can from the audience. not look anybody in the eye or shift quickly from person to person. This will turn them into human beings in your eyes rather than objects of awe. You’ll also build your credibility in their eyes. Make eye connection. Instead of eye contact , make eye connection. Eye contact has you flitting between people.

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How to Look Authoritative when you Feel Anything But

Speaking about Presenting

stand behind a lectern or as far away as they can from the audience. not look anybody in the eye or shift quickly from person to person. This will turn them into human beings in your eyes rather than objects of awe. You’ll also build your credibility in their eyes. Make eye connection. Instead of eye contact , make eye connection. Eye contact has you flitting between people.

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50 New Year’s Resolutions for Public Speakers

Manner of Speaking

I will make eye contact with the audience. I will speak without using a lectern. Some ideas to help you take your public speaking to the next level in 2012. In no particular order: 1. I will prepare. I will practice. I will have a clear message. I will be able to distill every speech and every presentation into a single sentence. I will always ask myself: “Why should the audience care about my message?” ” 6.

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50 New Year’s Resolutions for Public Speakers

Manner of Speaking

I will make eye contact with the audience. I will speak without using a lectern. Some ideas to help you take your public speaking to the next level in 2012. In no particular order: 1. I will prepare. I will practice. I will have a clear message. I will be able to distill every speech and every presentation into a single sentence. I will always ask myself: “Why should the audience care about my message?” ” 6.

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Presentation Barriers: Physical

Professionally Speaking...

The speaker must keep pace with the scrolling text and that makes eye contact with the audience challenging and likely fleeting. Minimize the teleprompter barrier by knowing the speech well enough that you can make eye contact with the audience beyond just darting glances. Using a podium or lectern cuts off 50 plus per cent of most people's bodies. Barriers are helpful between skin and sun or between deer and freshly planted flowers.

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Reading a Speech

Manner of Speaking

If you can learn your material well enough to be able to speak without notes, it is the best scenario for several reasons: You will not be stuck behind a lectern. If you have to read your speech and there is no lectern, you will have to hold your notes. You will be able to maintain eye contact with the audience.

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The 5-step cure for boring body language

Speaking about Presenting

Holding your hands together, putting them in your pockets, or hanging onto the lectern will stop you gesturing. But always be talking to someone (for more tips like this see: 8 presentation tips to make your eye contact more powerful ). Could your body language be more expressive? Do you inhibit your natural body language when you’re public speaking because of your self-consciousness?

The passionate scientist: Doing Q&A like Neil deGrasse Tyson

Presentation Zen

One of the keys to a natural, conversational approach includes removing all barriers to natural communication with the audience, barriers such as reading off notes, standing behind a lectern, using jargon, failing to make good eye contact, and speaking too softly or in a language that is formal, stiff, or fails to appeal to the audience's emotion and natural curiosity. Notice how he uses his body, and voice, and eye contact, etc.

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50 New Year’s Resolutions for Public Speakers

Manner of Speaking

I will make eye contact with the audience. I will speak without using a lectern. Some ideas to help you take your public speaking to the next level in 2012. In no particular order: 1. I will prepare. I will practice. I will have a clear message. I will be able to distill every speech and every presentation into a single sentence. I will always ask myself: “Why should the audience care about my message?” ” 6.

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A long time ago, before death by PowerPoint

Presentation Zen

Notice too how he has gathered the troops close to the front, how he himself stands close to the back-lit screen (even slightly in front of it at times), and maintains eye-contact with the audience, occasionally pointing to key areas of the animation on screen. Do not stand meekly in the corner or behind a lectern, removed from both the audience and the bright screen.

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How to keep to time during your presentation

Speaking about Presenting

Have a small, but easily readable, travel clock that you can put on the lectern or even in front of you on the stage. Related posts: 8 presentation tips to make your eye contact more powerful. Photo credit: zoutedrop. Do you regularly go over time when you’re delivering a presentation? If a time limit has been set for your presentation, then it’s your responsibility to finish it within that time. Consider it as part of the contract between you and your audience.

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Go Ahead … Read Your Speech!

Successful Speeches Blog

The most common arguments for not reading a speech are: it’s difficult to connect with your audience when you read your speech (lack of eye contact). Yes, it’s difficult to make eye contact if you keep your head buried in your papers the entire time, but you don’t have to do that. If you format your paper correctly (using only the top quarter of the page with your speech on a lectern), your eyes will not travel far down the page.

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Three levels of presentation openings - which should you use? : Speaking about Presenting

Speaking about Presenting

I walk out on stage with what looks like a written text, plop it on the lectern, grab on to the sides, look down and begin reading in a monotone. And here is a supposed speech expert who is immediately boring with monotone voice and no eye contact – bad! For only about 30 seconds though, as the energy plummets so quickly I then raise my voice, step out behind the lectern, look at people with good eye contact and rip up the speech.

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Step away from the laptop

Speak Schmeak

Since we've been talking about coming out from behind the lectern , let's talk about coming out from behind the computer. This is almost as restrictive as standing behind a lectern, although sometimes people walk around in between slides. Like standing behind a lectern, being tied to your computer: freezes you in position inhibits gestures reduces eye contact with your audience (every two minutes you're looking down for that key) and keeps you from moving freely around the stage.

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Are you canned or fresh?

Speak Schmeak

We can talk all day about logistics, like notes or no notes, lectern or no lectern, PowerPoint or no PowerPoint, props or no props. We can talk all day about the fine points of delivery: authenticity, eye contact, crutch phrases, humor, stories and whatnot. But if your content is not relevant to your audience, you are wasting their time. If your content is not applicable to their lives, you are wasting their time.

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Analysis of a Speech by Phil Davison

Manner of Speaking

2: If you must refer to extensive notes, you are probably better off staying behind th e lectern. He makes good eye contact and his voice is strong but measured – at least until he mentions his degree in communications. The video below has be en spreading like wildfire on the Internet. It is a short speech by Phil Davison, a Republican ca ndidate for the position of Treasurer in Stark County, Ohio.

The sushi of speaking: 7 bite-sized ideas to get you speech-ready

The Eloquent Woman

Practice your opener several times, so that you can do it without referring to your notes and make early eye contact with the audience. You want to be able to stand in a relaxed stance, without swaying or hanging on to the lectern, to look most authoritative--and to keep attention on your words. Bring a funny picture, child's drawing, or photo that only you can see at the lectern to start your speech with a welcoming face.

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Analysis of a Speech by Conan O’Brien

Manner of Speaking

Seriously, it looks like something a bear would use at an AA meeting.&# (8:20) [ NB - In fact, a podium is the platform on which you stand; a lectern is the furniture on which you place your notes. ]. Even though he read from his notes and the two teleprompters, he still made great eye contact with the audience. On 12 June 2011, Conan O’Brien delivered the commencement address to the 2011 graduating class of Dartmouth College.

Public Speaking - Create an Atmosphere Conducive to Laughter and Interaction

Great Public Speaking

It is easier to establish a bond when the speaker and the audience can see each other, which is one good reason to avoid reading your presentation from behind a lectern. I tried to make eye contact with him when he walked by me and he stared right through me. He was totally "in the dark" behind a lectern. Unless you are using slides or video projection, you want the room lights at maximum intensity for normal business presentations.

Is PowerPoint the new black?

Speak Schmeak

Standing behind the computer has a similar effect on your presentation as standing behind a lectern. Looking down at the keyboard every couple of minutes inhibits eye contact with the audience, and you're less likely to move around the stage if you have to come back for that key. Your physical presence, movement, voice, eye contact and energy are critical to keeping the audience's attention -- whether or not you use PowerPoint.

Great Presentations - Movement and Appearance

Great Public Speaking

Communication analyst Albert Mehrabian says we are perceived in three ways: 7 percent verbally, 38 percent vocally, and a full 55 percent visually, including gestures, posture, stride, facial expressions, movement, dress, and eye contact. It could be a hand on the hip, a wrinkled brow, a raise of the eyebrows, or leaning against the lectern. Edward T. Hall, the noted social anthropologist, claims 60 percent of all communication is nonverbal.

Public Speaking: Taking Your Presentation International

Great Public Speaking

Eye contact and facial expression. Asians do not like to make eye contact with the speaker as a matter of respect. However, they may not make eye contact with women speakers as a matter of respect. Greeting rituals * Before beginning to speak to a Japanese audience, always bow in front of the lectern. * Presenting to international audiences is much different than public speaking in the United States.

Does your face reveal your discomfort?

Speak Schmeak

So instead I have a picture where my eyes and mouth turn down at the corners and I look like one mean mama. Because they're all hidden behind lecterns , you don't see much of their bodies. The ones who don't handle it well smirk, smile with tight lips, shake their heads, and look down at the lectern instead of maintaining eye contact with the other person. My drivers license picture is terrible.

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Analysis of a Speech by Conan O’Brien

Manner of Speaking

Seriously, it looks like something a bear would use at an AA meeting.&# (8:20) [ NB - In fact, a podium is the platform on which you stand; a lectern is the furniture on which you place your notes. ]. Even though he read from his notes and the two teleprompters, he still made great eye contact with the audience. On 12 June 2011, Conan O’Brien delivered the commencement address to the 2011 graduating class of Dartmouth College.

Famous Speech Friday: Mother Teresa at the 1994 National Prayer Breakfast

The Eloquent Woman

Mother Teresa is mostly hidden behind the bank of microphones at the lectern. It's impossible to read her facial expressions, it's impossible for her to reach out to her audience with eye contact and of course it's just bad tv. In the yearly Gallup poll of most admired men and women, Mother Teresa has no competition. The Roman Catholic nun was named to the top 10 list of most admired women 18 times, and Americans called her their most admired person of the 20th century.

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9 things to check if you're speaking from a text

The Eloquent Woman

Check the distance from your face to the lectern. You''d think all lecterns were standardized, but they''re not--and neither is the height and vision of the speaker. If you are working from a text that''s not in your first language, you need to include pauses, eye contact, body language and other non-verbal aids to understanding. "As

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4 Skills We Can Learn From Obama's Speech

The Speaker Point

Gabby opened her eyes for the first time. Gabby opened her eyes.” Gabby opened her eyes so I can tell you she knows we are here, she knows we love her, and she knows we are rooting for her…” [more cheers and applause]. Watch at minute 30:10, when he starts with “Imagine for a moment, here was a young girl who was just becoming aware of our democracy… she saw all this through the eyes of a child.” Eye-contact is crucial and Obama lacks that to the utmost.

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week 14: Stephanie considers her message delivery

The Eloquent Woman

For video or for speaking with a lectern, she'll need to move her hands higher and into view for gestures to really be effective. She wants to pay attention to her visual "ums," those moments when she looks away and breaks eye contact so she can pause and think about what she wants to say--or remember it. Related posts: Can eye contact trip you up?

Public Speaking: Stage Fright Tips

Great Public Speaking

Strategies when the program begins: If legs are trembling, lean on lectern /table or shift legs or move. Use eye contact. Try not to hold the microphone by hand in the first minute. Don't hold notes. The audience can see them shake. Use three-by-five cards instead. Take quick drinks of tepid water. It will make you feel less isolated. Look at the friendliest faces in the audience. Joke about your nervousness. What's the right wine to go with fingernails?"

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Fact & fiction about body language 2: Does it matter what you wear or where you stand?

Max Atkinson

Are Lecterns and Tables Barriers to Communication? A lectern stood between the person reading the lesson and the congregation, but it never once occurred to me during all those years that it was a barrier, or that it was somehow reducing the effectiveness of the reader’s impact. Many years later, more and more of those who read lessons in church have taken to standing next to the lectern in full view of the congregation.

I was wrong about Cameron looking at screens

Max Atkinson

If you watch the clip below, you'll not only see his eyes looking down at the lectern, but, when the camera pulls back to show us a wider angle, you won't see any sign at all of any autocue screens on poles (that are normally all too clearly visible). I suppose that the reason for my mistake is that we've become so used to politicians using teleprompters that we assume they all do it, and that Mr Cameron's 'naturally' skewed eye contact gave the impression that he was doing it too.

Sussing out your speaker space: A checklist

The Eloquent Woman

Can I move around that arrangement for better eye contact and engagement? If there's a lectern , what's on it or built into it? Several of these items might best be answered with an emailed photo -- especially of the room shape, seating, the lectern from the speaker's viewpoint, and more. Related posts: A checklist to prepare the whole speaker Working with program managers Use-or-lose lectern lessons When the speech hands you lemons (about that plan B).

Bridging the Gap

Can You Hear Me Up the Back?

We all know how important nonverbal communication is to presentations - facial expressions, tone, eye contact and so forth. In these situations the best a presenter can do is come out from behind the lectern, and throw as much energy as you can into your delivery. This one is as much for meeting managers as it is for presenters, because the distance between stage and audience is usually out of the control of the speaker.

7 bite-sized ideas to get you speech-ready

The Eloquent Woman

Practice your opener several times, so that you can do it without referring to your notes and make early eye contact with the audience. You want to be able to stand in a relaxed stance, without swaying or hanging on to the lectern, to look most authoritative--and to keep attention on your words. Bring a funny picture, child's drawing, or photo that only you can see at the lectern to start your speech with a welcoming face.

Toastmasters Friday: How Smooth is Your Choreography?

Speak and Deliver

When transitioning from one participant to another in front of the room, work to be consistent in what you do, whether you meet people halfway or make them come to the lectern. If you are in control of the meeting, be clear who you are tossing control to, and signal them both verbally and with eye contact so as not to catch them off guard. This week I attended my 11 year old daughters first Glee performance.

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