January, 2007

Adult Learning Principles, Part 7: Problem-Oriented

Speak Schmeak

Today's post is the last in the Adult Learning Principles series. There's so much more information out there, but I just wanted to give a basic overview that can help any speaker, instructor or facilitator make a better connection with and create a better learning environment for your audience.

Timing Yourself

Speaking Of...

Do you consider time in every speech or presentation you give? If you are media savvy , the answer has to be yes. Those who work in radio or television know that time is a finite resource and going overtime is the enemy. To consider: in your next presentation of any kind, rehearse your talk, timing it as you go. This will let you know right away what stays and what you throw overboard. Think about 'nice to know' versus 'need to know,' especially in educational type talks.

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When is changing a graph axis OK?

Dave Paradi's PowerPoint Blog

One of the things I find deceiving when looking at graphs on slides is when the vertical axis on a column chart has no values. In many cases, this means that the scale does not start at zero and it means the presenter is trying to fool their audience into thinking that the graph tells a story that is better than reality. Check out most of the graphs you see in corporate quarterly analyst briefings and you'll see what I mean.

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Your Speech: Intelectual Property

Executive Speech Coach

Your Speech: Intellectual Property Your words – both written and spoken are your intellectual property. Of course the same applies to other writers and speakers. Be careful what you steal – or are tempted to steal. Copyright law protects a work when it is created. A speech is created when it is delivered. An article is protected when it is written. After I delivered a speech to an accounting association, an audience member approached me to compliment me on my speech.

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Adult Learning Principles, Part 6: Sensitive Egos

Speak Schmeak

Adult learning principle #5: Adult learners have sensitive egos Many of us, over the course of a lifetime, have developed a fear of appearing stupid or incompetent. As children, we were encouraged to explore, ask questions and learn about the world, but somewhere along the way, that was taken away from us. Many adults have mixed feelings about teachers, school, and structured learning.

Adult Learning Principles, Part 5: Motivations & Barriers

Speak Schmeak

Adult learning principle #4: Adults are motivated to learn by both external and internal factors When we were kids, many of us were not motivated to learn by anything other than our parents' and teachers' rewards and punishments.

Adult Learning Principles, Part 4: Relevancy

Speak Schmeak

Adult learning principle #3: Adults need relevancy in learning. It's important to adults that they are learning something relevant and applicable to real life, whether it's work-related or personal. Here's how to make learning relevant to your audience. Identify learning objectives and ask participants to share their goals. Discuss and ask for sharing of real-world applications of your topic. Avoid giving a workshop or presentation that's too theoretical.

More Trending

Adult Learning Principles

Speak Schmeak

Did you know that adults have special needs as learners? When we were kids, we went to school, and we sat through class every day, and our teachers taught everyone pretty much the same way. It didn't really matter if you were a visual learner, or an auditory learner, or a kinesthetic learner. The teacher pretty much did whatever she/he felt most comfortable doing. Times have changed, and teachers are more aware of learning styles now, and other issues that affect children's learning.

Adult Learning Principles, Part 2: Autonomy

Speak Schmeak

And now for our first adult learning principle : Adults are autonomous and self-directed Adults want to decide for themselves what, when, how and why to learn. Speakers/instructors should allow adults to direct some of their own learning. Here are some ways to facilitate this: * Ask your participants what they already know about your topic and what they're interested in learning. Find out what their goals are for being there. Share your agenda and ask for input.

Adult Learning Principles, Part 1: Background

Speak Schmeak

This is part 1 of my series of posts on adult learning principles and how speakers can apply these principles when working with adults. First, a little history. Malcolm Knowles is considered the "father of adult learning", although the topic had been discussed and researched over a century earlier.

Speaking Time

Speaking Of...

I began coaching a dietetic intern today on an upcoming educational presentation she is giving for our company. Over the next few posts I'll be highlighting some issues that came up during our session. The first issue is respecting the audience's time. That means being aware of your time frame to speak, to the point that you never go over your allotted time. We discussed examples of speakers who do this, and what impression 'going long' makes on the audience.

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First Impressions--in Person

Speaking Of...

Which brings up the point--which first impressions have been right and which have been wrong? They say that we form a visual impression within seconds--is that true? Have you ever made an impression you weren't aiming for? An interesting exercise is to watch the CSPAN networks and form impressions of politicians, anchors and authors who appear on the networks.

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First Impressions

Speaking Of...

Fist impressions are powerful. I was thinking about just how much we learn through a single phone call, meeting, appointment, etc. Now my husband has formed an impression, through two similar phone encounters with a stranger, described in the last post, that she is communication challenged. My one in-person meeting with this same person formed an altogether different impression. Shyness and fear often cover up the real you, the person inside who is waiting to be heard.

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Back to the Blog

Speaking Of...

After being away for a while it's back to the blog today, hopefully on a more regular basis. Today's thought--what first impressions have wowed you and which ones have left you cold? Case in point--recently an acquaintance called my home, asking for directions to a Toastmasters club meeting. I was out and she spoke to my husband but it was clear she was nervous speaking to a stranger. Thoughts to consider. *do

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PowerPoint Tip - Using Hyper-links

Dave Paradi's PowerPoint Blog

One of the topics I discussed in a presentation on future trends in presentations last month was the use of hyper-links to create non- linear presentations and include other content in our presentations. The ability of PowerPoint to link to content within or outside the current set of slides allows you to create and deliver a more flexible presentation customized to what your audience needs at that moment. Let's look at some of the options hyper-linking gives you.

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Finding commands in PowerPoint 2007

Dave Paradi's PowerPoint Blog

On January 30th, the new version of Microsoft Office goes on sale to the public and will be the version that you get pre-installed on a new computer. As I have mentioned before, the user interface is quite different from the drop down list of commands under menus that we are all familiar with. The new interface relies on ribbons of commands instead. When you first start using the new version, you will have to learn where the commands you want to use are now located.

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"But that's going to be different"

Dave Paradi's PowerPoint Blog

I am working with a client who has a big presentation coming up next month. They are presenting in front of the top executives in their organization and want to make a good impression. I was reviewing the outline for the presentation with them and they asked how many slides will they have for a 20-30 minute presentation. I said, "About 15, why?" They got quiet for a moment and shared that having only 15 slides would be very different from how they normally present.

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Presentation Skills: New Year

Executive Speech Coach

Presentation Skills: New Year What skills will help you the most this year? The usual suspects might be time management, delegation, stress management, problem solving, communication, and presentation skills. If “presentation skills” is on your short list then this blog is one place for you to stay tuned. On this Executive Speech Coach blog you will read tips, insights and examples of presentation skills. You will learn about presentation traps to avoid.

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PowerPoint Tip: How Attitude Affects Your Presentation

Dave Paradi's PowerPoint Blog

When you are presenting, certainly your message and key points are important. But perhaps as important is your attitude towards your audience and your material. Attitude is not something that most of us consciously consider on a daily basis - but perhaps we should. I am sure we have all seen presentations that suffered from a lack of interest in the topic by the presenter or contempt for the audience by the presenter.

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When inserting isn't really inserting

Dave Paradi's PowerPoint Blog

When you click Insert - Picture in PowerPoint, it inserts the contents of the picture file into your presentation. While this could make your presentation file huge if you don't resample the picture first, you know that when you send the file to someone else they will be able to see the picture. So in this case, inserting really is inserting. I recently helped a client understand that when PowerPoint says Insert, it doesn't always mean it. Here's what happened.

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Practical Speaking Tips: #1

Executive Speech Coach

Drink Water Before you give a speech, deliver a sales presentation or make phone calls - drink one to two glasses of water. It lubricates your vocal chords, helps your voice and gives you needed fluids that you lose while speaking. Lukewarm water is best; cool water also works well. However, ice water is not good for your vocal chords. Avoid dairy.

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