Make your talk better with practice and memorization

The Eloquent Woman

At most conferences, you get a mix of people reading from PowerPoint decks, using teleprompters, or simply ad-libbing around loose outlines. From the article: All the live practice began to reshape the talk itself. This, too, comes easier with practice.

2015 92

The 135 Rule

OnSpeechwriting

Heres a question that comes up nearly every week from someone: How much do I need to write for a speech of XX minutes? My general rule of thumb on the length of speeches is to write – as a first draft – 135 words per delivered minute. I used to write for an executive from Mississippi. But he also liked to ad-lib. The 135 Rule lasts as long as the first practice. So if you can be in the room – with a stopwatch – when the speaker practices, do it.

2012 58

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Melting Speaker's Brain Freeze: The Show Must Go On.

Speak and Deliver

He had been sailing along through his story, and abruptly broke out of his speaking mode, standing up straight and proclaiming "Wow - I've practiced this speech so many times, and now it's just gone. Push Through Practice - most people stop and start when they practice.

2011 86

Web Ink Now: Top ten tips for incredibly successful public speaking

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

Facebook and YouTube blocked by paranoid corporations at their own peril 8 tips to make your YouTube video go viral Top 5 corporate blogging mistakes and how to avoid them Thank you for helping me to write The New Rules of Marketing & PR! Prepare and practice. I was curious though, as an experienced speaker, when you were first starting out how many times would you practice your presentation before your speaking engagement? DO you write it out?

Web 52

Rands In Repose: Keynote Kung-fu Two

http://delicious.com/akarrer/prospeaker

That seven-slide deck that turned into an hour of ad-libbed brilliance. How To Not Throw Up and Out Loud walk you through the basics of constructing and practicing your presentation, but there’s more to say about Keynote because, as with any well-designed tool, the more you use it, the better you get and the more layers of awesomeness you will find. In your practicing, you’re going to know the regular flow of your deck, but what about when you screw up?