Sunday February 13, 2005

Speaking Of...

Happy Sunday. As I continue the blog my hope is to share with you my insights on public speaking, my passion, and to offer my feedback to help you speak with confidence. Everyone has their own unique message. Our job in life, I believe, is to unleash that message for all to hear. I invite you to suggest topics and I will respond with my best answer

2005 40

Presidents Day

Speaking Of...

President's Day. Most people see this as another holiday to pursue recreation and leisure. I'm reflecting today on the great leaders who have given us the precious gift of freedom. Freedom of speech is another one of those rights we in America take for granted. But for many worldwide it isn't.My My personal freedom of speech heroes include Jefferson, Washington, Lincoln, F. Roosevelt. Usually confined to history books, these visionaries defined, in their day, what freedom means.

2005 40

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Saturday February 19

Speaking Of...

Welcome to the weekend.Another cold one up in the Northeast. It seems like winter is still settled in here. How are things in your neck of the woods

2005 40

Checkin' In

Speaking Of...

Welcome back. Would love to hear from any of you who received my first message. Consider this our meeting place. I have so many RD friends, old and new. This seemed like the perfect way to meet

2005 40

Welcome

Speaking Of...

Just back from the Florida sun. A welcome break from the northeast snow. A question for y'all.what what do you fear most about speaking in front of groups

2005 40

Famous Speech Friday: Jennifer Granholm's 2005 tribute to Rosa Parks

The Eloquent Woman

But she is also more than equal to the challenge of delivering a dramatic, deeply-felt speech, as she did at the 2005 funeral service for civil rights icon Rosa Parks. We've said it before: Jennifer Granholm is a rock star of public speaking.

2005 84

Blog Or Just Tweet? - What Came To Me From Blogging Since 2005

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

Should we blog? Or is tweeting enough? In  In fact, has Twitter become a more powerful communications tool than blogging? That's what clients ask me. After all, what compelled the attention of the world during the Silicon Valley trial "Pao v.

2005 65

Podcast: ProActive Networking

Communication Steroids

Skip to content Follow: RSS Twitter Home About Contact Us Current Programs Inner Circle Newsletter Products 20 Presentation Skills That Kill: Audio CDSeminar Social Media and Public Relations: Audio Task Oriented Teams: Audio CDSeminar What We Do Tags LinkedIn Podcast: ProActive Networking by Tim 'Gonzo' Gordon on March 15, 2010 What does it take to network effectively both online and in-person? Tim ‘Gonzo’ Gordon and Roger Pike discuss various networking ideas and strategies they use for both online and in-person meet ‘n’ greets. What to do, how to meet people, what kinds of things to bring up, how they use LinkedIn and more…Tim and Roger talk about what works for them. photo credit: stevepurkiss Podcast: ProActive Networking [15:46m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download From → Communication Skills , Networking , Online Communication , Podcast 2 Comments Heather Stubbs permalink Thank you so much for this, Roger and Tim! How lucky for me that you posted this podcast at this time! My local Chamber of Commerce has asked me to give a short presentation on networking at our next business card exchange. I sat here taking notes. It was so validating to hear you say numerous things I would have said, myself, especially “reach out; don’t hang our with your cronies&# and “be a listener, not a talker.&# As a matter of fact, my next blog article is on exactly that topic. [link]. So thank you. I love Communication Steroids. Tim 'Gonzo' Gordon permalink Thanks Heather – glad you liked the podcast. Next week’s touches on the same subject but from a different angle. It’ll be out on Tuesday morning. I took a look at your blog and got an introduction to your very interesting history and pursuits. Glad to have you as a follower! Comments are closed. Public Speaking Courses | Add your site Join Our Inner Circle: RSS Feed of our latest newsletters here Search This Website Become a Fan on Facebook! Communication Steroids on Facebook Instant Download: Improve Your Public Speaking Skills! Our 8-part audio program has shown to be one of the most effective ways you can improve your public speaking and communication skills without actually hiring a personal coach. In these 30-minute audio recordings, WE ARE your coaches! Click here for more details on how you can get the speaking skills to fast-track your career, deal with the media and give confident speeches and presentations anywhere! Subscribe to Communication Steroids blog and podcast feed Subscribe in a reader Download our free report: “Getting Over the Fear of Public Speaking&# No strings attached! Just click here and youll have our free report on Getting Over the Fear of Public Speaking. Its a conversation Roger and Tim had that was transcribed to an 11-page report. Check it out! Categories Book Review Change Communication Skills Communication Steroids TV Creativity E-mail communications Guest Post Interview Language Learning Making Public Speaking FUN! management skills Media Mentoring Networking newspaper Online Communication Podcast Productivity Public Relations Public speaking Review Sales Presentations Social Media Speech Writing Team Presentations Traditional media Transition Uncategorized Video Webinar Written Communication Recent Posts Podcast: Speech Preparation and Research Material SOCIAL MEDIA: KEY TO YOUR CAREER Podcast: Social Media is NOT New Exquisitely Great Marketing Plus Lousy Follow-up Equals NO SALE Podcast: PR for the Nuclear Industry After Japan Podcast: Building Blocks of Your First Speech Podcast: Electronic Etiquette Pages About Contact Us Current Programs Inner Circle Newsletter Products 20 Presentation Skills That Kill: Audio CDSeminar Social Media and Public Relations: Audio Task Oriented Teams: Audio CDSeminar What We Do March 2010 M T W T F S S « Feb Apr » 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Tim on Twitter ~~ Meta Register Log in Entries RSS Comments RSS WordPress.org About Communication Steroids: Add Muscle to Your Message 1370 Evergreen Ave NE, Salem, OR 97301 (503) 589-4494 Legal Information & Disclaimer | Anti-SPAM Policy | Acceptable Use & Privacy Policy Communication Steroids © Copyright -2009. All Rights Reserved Categories Categories Book Review Change Communication Skills Communication Steroids TV Creativity E-mail communications Guest Post Interview Language Learning Making Public Speaking FUN! management skills Media Mentoring Networking newspaper Online Communication Podcast Productivity Public Relations Public speaking Review Sales Presentations Social Media Speech Writing Team Presentations Traditional media Transition Uncategorized Video Webinar Written Communication Search Copyright © 2011 Communication Steroids. Titan Theme by The Theme Foundry. Podcast powered by podPress (v8.8 / v8.8.6.3) Array

NSA/NC Speaker Academy Success Stories

Ian Griffin - Professionally Speaking

The Northern California Chapter of the National Speakers Association has been running an Academy for emerging speakers since 2005. The Speakers Academy (originally called Pro-Track) has graduated over 300 speakers from the year-long training program.

NSA 204

Thanks to You Readers, This Blog Celebrates Its 14th Anniversary

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

You readers were there, all eyes, when this blog launched in April 2005. You took the time to follow, leave comments, ask questions, and make suggestions.    That kept me hunting for exactly the right content. And to post it in ways that made you satisfied that you clicked on. 

2019 56

What can you do in 30 seconds?

More than PowerPoint...

Throwback Thursday… In 2005, Merv Griffin said he wrote the Jeopardy! them e song in under a minute. “That little 30 seconds has made me a fortune, millions,” he said. How much exactly? Somewhere between 70 and 80 million. And that was ten years ago.

2015 77

Meeting Report: The wit and wisdom of speechwriter Hal Gordon

Ian Griffin - Professionally Speaking

Since 2005, Hal has provided executive speech writing for top executives of Shell Oil, Royal Dutch Shell, CenterPoint Energy, GE […] On Thursday September 17, 2015 the Silicon Valley Speechwriters welcomed Hal Gordon as our guest on a conference call. Since 2005, Hal has provided executive speech writing for top executives of Shell Oil, Royal Dutch Shell, CenterPoint Energy, GE Aero Energy, UPS, Sim-Tex LP, cPanel and the Greater Houston Partnership.

2015 147

Respect for the Dead Isn't Due - The Legacy of Bernie Ebbers

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

In 2005, he began his 25-year sentence for securities fraud. It was the scandal that ate right into investors' retirement accounts. I lost a bundle. And after lawyers took their fee in a shareholder lawsuit, I received less than 20 bucks. That kicked off in 2002.

2020 52

Prepare and Thrive Financially During Difficult Times with Gerard Braud

Speaker Launcher

In 2005, he was hit by Hurricane Katrina, which devastated his hometown of New Orleans. In the frenzy of closures and cancellations the last few days, my goal became to put out some positive ideas and information.

2020 55

Yet Again, Court of Public Opinion Has Greater Reach than Points of Law - Saving Nathaniel Woods

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

That was 2005. his amazing situation will circle back to points of law. But for now, the last-minute stay of execution of Nathaniel Woods by the U.S. Supreme Court is a story of activism by celebrities Kim Kardashian and Martin Luther King III. Daily Mail fills in all the details.

2020 52

Steve Jobs – Public Speaking, Preparation & Practice

Matt Eventoff

Stanford Commencement – 2005. The speed at which information travels has rendered most news dated within hours; days if a story really has “legs.” ” To last through multiple news cycles is very rare. The passing of Steve Jobs has done just that, and for good reason.

Book Review: The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs

Ian Griffin - Professionally Speaking

He’s a college drop-out whose eloquent 2005 Stanford University Commencement address has been watched [.]. The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience Steve Jobs is the exception to the rule – a corporate executive whose product introductions captivate audiences as powerfully as the best motivational speakers.

2005 109

Talking about presentations with Nancy Duarte

Presentation Zen

About eight years ago Nancy contacted me out of the blue—and it will be eight years exactly this December that I first met Nancy and Mark Duarte at their offices in Mountain View California (post from 2005).

2013 109

Seasons Greetings to Readers

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

  Paul Chaney taught me about this then new medium of blogging back in 2005. This is our ninth holiday season together.   With your comments and page views you taught me how to cut to the bone in communicating whatever.

2013 70

Harvard's Apologizes, But Was It Necessary?

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

The time was 2005. Intense media coverage of Jeffrey Epstein's association with elite universities has put Harvard on the hot seat. Predictably, Harvard's president Lawrence Bacow has put out there an elaborate mea culpa. Eloquent, of course.

2019 52

Book Review: The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs

Ian Griffin - Professionally Speaking

He’s a college drop-out whose eloquent 2005 Stanford University Commencement address has been watched [.]. The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience Steve Jobs is the exception to the rule – a corporate executive whose product introductions captivate audiences as powerfully as the best motivational speakers.

2005 100

Book Review: The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs

Ian Griffin - Professionally Speaking

He’s a college drop-out whose eloquent 2005 Stanford University Commencement address has been watched [.]. The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience Steve Jobs is the exception to the rule – a corporate executive whose product introductions captivate audiences as powerfully as the best motivational speakers.

2005 100

Power Outage at Boeing

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

Luttig served in that position since 2005. No surprise, following the exit of chief executive officer Dennis Muilenburg from Boeing comes the retirement of the general counsel Mike Luttig. Since last May he handled the legalities associated with the 737 MAX. In the two crashes of that model 346 human beings had died. Here are more details from The Wall Street Journal.

2019 40

Create a PowerPoint handout from selected slides

PowerPoint Tips

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005. A subscriber ask me how she could create a printed handout that contains only some of the slides in the presentation. She wanted to create a handout with 3 slides per page. Here are the steps: For PowerPoint 2010. Choose File> Print.

Scott McCloud: Presenting comics in a new (media) world

Presentation Zen

I linked to this 2005 TED talk a few years ago, but it''s worth linking to again today. I''m a big fan of Scott McCloud''s work.

2014 101

Steve Jobs (1955-2011)

Presentation Zen

All his presentations were great, but my favorite one of Steve's is not his usual Apple presentation, but rather a short 15-minute speech delivered from behind a lectern at Stanford University in the spring of 2005. Steve Jobs passed away today. He was just 56.

2011 105

"Digital First" Probably Won't Save Metro Newspapers

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

In that study , journalism professor at the University of Texas at Austin, Hsiang Ins Chyi, found that the growth in website readership was two-tenth of a percent between 2007 and 2005.

Metro 56

"Criminal Minds" - No more Aaron Hotchner, played by Thomas Gibson

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

Launched in 2005, it features an elite team of FBI employees who create profiles of the bad guys. The television series "Criminal Minds" probably has been singlehandedly responsible for motivating our best and brightest to apply for jobs at the FBI.

2016 52

Trailer for my new book coming out in 2014 and featuring extracts from this blog

Max Atkinson

TURN A DEAF EAR: CONVERSING, COMMENTING AND COMMUNICATING MAX ATKINSON By the same author Discovering Suicide: Studies in the Social Organization of Sudden Death (1978) London, The Macmillan Press Order in Court: The Organisation of Verbal Interaction in Judicial Settings (with Paul Drew) (1979) London, The Macmillan Press.

2014 43

Bentley, Nina Pham's Dog, Okay For Now

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

"A 2005 study of an Ebola outbreak in Gabon, Africa, suggests dogs can be infected with the virus but not suffer any symptoms."  "  - Bruce Golding, the New York Post, October 13, 2014. Here is the article.

2014 65

If you are a presenter you MUST watch this company: Prezi (new features just released) — Scobleizer

Thoughts On Presenting And Design

Scobleizer Searching for world-changing technology Home About Archives Index Favorites Posts Comments If you are a presenter you MUST watch this company: Prezi (new features just released) September 10, 2010 By Robert Scoble Maybe because I worked at Microsoft for three years I really can’t stand Microsoft PowerPoint. Every time I start a presentation I joke that I will not force my audience to sit through boring slides so I won’t be using PowerPoint today. This joke NEVER fails to get applause. Why? Because we’ve all seen boring presentations. To undernote just how powerful PowerPoint’s pull on people is, one day I was hanging out in the Starbucks on Sand Hill Road with a famous venture capitalist. We came across the team from RedBeacon. You know them because they won Techcrunch 50. But this day the team was going up and down Sand Hill Road looking for funding (they were successful on that visit because they raised $7.4 million ). But they were working on their pitch, using Microsoft PowerPoint. I could tell it was the kind of pitch that bores the hell out of me. You know, the standard nine slides with nine points each. A slide for the market opportunity. Another one for the team. That kind of thing. I turned to my VC friend and asked him whether he liked sitting through PowerPoint slides like this. He answered “no.&# But the team went back to work on the slide deck anyway. It’s too bad, because there’s a far better tool to use for doing presentations. It’s Prezi and here I interview CEO Peter Arvai about the new collaboration features they turned on last night and also see some of the ways you can use Prezi to make better presentations. (You can follow Peter on Twitter here ). I’ve studied why PowerPoint is so boring. There are several problems with it: 1. It forces you into linear thinking. “First we’ll talk about the market opportunity, then we’ll talk about the team, then we’ll talk about the challenges, etc etc.&# 2. It encourages you to put a lot of words on screen. The best way to make a boring slide is put more than nine words on it. Have you ever seen Steve Jobs with a slide that has more than nine words on it? I haven’t. Yet in PowerPoint it happens nearly every slide. Why? It affords that. 3. PowerPoint doesn’t give you control over typography. All slides have the same crappy look. Why? Because you can’t use custom typography easily. I remember watching the guy who designed Bill Gates’ slides. He rarely used the tools inside PowerPoint, rather he’d design the slides in Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator, and import them into PowerPoint as graphics. That’s why Bill Gates’ slides always looked better than average PowerPoint users, but it was very hard and took a very talented graphic designer to do. 4. PowerPoint doesn’t let you collaborate nicely with other people. 5. Adding motion to PowerPoint is difficult and when Microsoft makes it easy it rarely is to focus on the message. With Prezi you can zoom in, which gets your audience to pay attention to the message. It’s the ultimate “drill down.&# But with PowerPoint, when you find the animation tools, it affords flying text or goofy cartoons that will fly in on your slides. Looks like amateur hour, which is why most professional presenters don’t use these tools, but even when you use them they don’t add much to your points. Anyway, if you want to do better presentations, you should visit the Presentation Zen blog , and you should use Prezi instead of Microsoft PowerPoint. By the way, Prezi is hosted on Rackspace and we’re very proud to be hosting this very cool company that was invested in by TED, too. Filed Under: Web [link] rickmans Regarding animations you might want to check pptplex. Prezi is by far better in motion, to pptplex compensates a bit: [link] [link] Scobleizer The problem is that still uses PowerPoint, which encourages you to do bad presentations. [link] rickmans A fool with a tool is still a fool. People messing up presentation in powerpoint will be probably messing up the experience in Prezi as well and people who were already great with powerpoint (and managed to get around the limitations) are probably great with Prezi. [link] James Clark We use Prezi and love it. We get all kinds of positive feedback each time we present with it. The hurdle to overcome is creating high rez images to place in the presentation – screen shots look like ass. So our approach was to create a presentation about Room 214 that is evergreen and then we revert to PPT of Keynote to create quick custom presentations. So we’re going down the road of bailing out of PPT, but can’t quite make the final leap. [link] Sean McMahon My wife is an elementary school teacher and finds Prezi to be a valuable tool for developing presentations both for and by her students. [link] The Transfer Station concept sounds great – love to see it in action but server is busy (nice work Scobleizer ) [link] John McLachlan I’ve become a huge believer in hardly any or no words on a slide. I also create a lot of slides in Illustrator so I get the typography I like. I’m going to check out Prezi. [link] The Transfer Station you absolutely need a framework and defined content with a linear path to track along – but nothing ever goes 100% to plan – this seems a great way to allow for alternate paths thru the content, I suppose a likely pitfall is that too-creative types giving presentations can too easily be pulled off track. [link] Scobleizer I totally disagree. Why? Affordances. Powerpoint AFFORDS doing crappy presentations that are linear. Prezi doesn’t. Anonymous I prefer to call it PowerPointLess, whenever someone starts it, i run away… [link] Scobleizer I find that isn’t the case. Prezi lets you build a path and give a normal linear presentation. If someone takes you off, you have a choice as a presenter whether to zoom out and zoom into a specific point. But all the other points are there reminding you to get through them. [link] Jon Thomas Prezi looks fantastic, although the learning curve is pretty large. If you can get over that, your presentation is guaranteed to be like no other. Though in PowerPoint’s defense, it’s just a tool, as is Keynote. Garr Reynolds uses PowerPoint/Keynote and his presentations are fantastic. Duarte Design created a PowerPoint presentation that helped Al Gore turn his vision into a movie. If you know how to effectively use the tool and are willing to take the time to structure/develop/practice, you can create a great presentation. Those tools give little guidance however, so it’s VERY easy to travel down the wrong (boring, bullet-point ridden) road. Jon Thomas Presentation Advisors [link] [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] dbarefoot Agreed. Unfortunately, most people develop a speech by creating slides (instead of writing it out or creating an outline). PowerPoint drives a certain kind of linear, rote thinking. Prezi breaks that model. Is Prezi fundamentally better than PowerPoint? I’m not sure, but I love that it’s making people rethink how they present information. Plus, I still hear little gasps or mutterings whenever I start a Prezi-powered presentation, and people see the first slick animation. Now, if they could only fix their screenshot-sizing problem, I’d be completely happy. [link] Gib Wallis Don’t you think if everyone uses Prezi that the style of the presentation will get boring then, too? A lot of business people aren’t really good at non-linear, and honestly, presentations can be jazzy and fun and completely linear, like Steve Jobs announcing a new product. [link] Bill Hill I hate boring presentations. Most of them are made by boring people. They use PowerPoint because even an idiot can create slides using it. Before I worked for Microsoft, I worked for Aldus. They had a presentations application called Persuasion which IMO was much better than PPT. Persuasion was killed by Microsoft, when it bundled PPT into Office. In the comparatively small world of startups presenting to VCs, a new presentation app might seem like a great idea. But in the larger real world, in which people want the world’s leading word processor, the world’s leading spreadsheet AND a presentation graphics package, the chances of a new competitor knocking PPT off its perch are near zero. Bill Gates needed all the help he could get. He was not a naturally engaging speaker; people listened because of who he was and because what he said was usually important – not because of how he said it. You CAN make a non-boring presentation using PPT. It’s easy. Create slides with no more than six bullets per slide – if that. And then DON’T BE BORING! If you don’t have a great, engaging presenter, just hand out the slides to your VC folks, tell them you presume they can read and offer to answer any questions. Then focus on the interesting – whatever your company has to offer that’s different and new, and why. The real evil of PPT bundled with Office is that it fools everyone into thinking they can be a good presenter. They can’t. It’s a performing art, like music, or dance. However cool-looking the slides you can throw up on a screen, they won’t work unless you can (metaphorically) dance with the people watching them. [link] PXLated Your last paragraph nails it – Presi isn’t going to help if you just suck. [link] Ken Rosen Even if you accept the linearity of Powerpoint (for now…), each slide should beg you to ask “what is the best way to get this point across?&# I’ve found a ridiculously simple tactic to improve presentations: set your default slide to be “Title only.&# When the default is the text slide, people fall into using it without even thinking. In that sense, Powerpoint doesn’t just “afford&# bad slides (borrowing Robert’s term above), it encourages it. Defaulting to “title only&# forces you to take the 3 seconds to decide the best way to express something. And the vast majority of the time, that is likely to be the sort of graphic Prezi specializes in…NOT the usual 4 bullets with two sub-points each. Ken Rosen Blog: [link] [link] Rob I checked out Presi a while ago, and the basic abilities were awesome, so for the seasoned presenter who is more comfortable scanning his slides, and powerfully talking about them, it really is a hit, but for those who invest a ton of time into their “decks&# with all sorts of fancy features and high quality pictures…they still come up unsatisfied with Presi…it’s a shame, but with continued features, they are only going to gain ground. I’m with you on the stigma Powerpoint carries, it’s just a beast that needs to be put down. Keynote on the other hand, what a beautiful application! [link] PXLated Agree 100%, Keynote is wonderful. Use it for every client presentation and not a bullet point in sight. [link] Eyes And Feet Prezi is amazing; we have a paid account with them and have almost stopped using powerpoint for many of our presentations. In fact, our app has some ‘learning content’ – and all of it is done on Prezi (like this one on 50 power tips for businesses using twitter [link] The (rare) downtimes (I think it is Prezi, not Rackspace) were earlier a concern but seem to be getting better now. Anyway, they provide an offline viewer to get around this. Anonymous Been using it for entire they have been out and there still is nothing that helps have good images or screen shots with clarity. If someone found a solution then share please. Other than that I get lots of WOW what was that you used? Anonymous Been using it for entire they have been out and there still is nothing that helps have good images or screen shots with clarity. If someone found a solution then share please. Other than that I get lots of WOW what was that you used? [link] Eyes And Feet Not sure what issues you’re facing. While images may look blurred in birds eye view, they are fine when you zoom in (yes, a little lower in res than ppt). Take a look at this one we did at my wife’s non profit: [link] – at the 3rd click you see a comic strip – are you NOT getting this kind of resolution, or is it that you get this but it’s not good enough? I’m not a prezi expert but will try to help. And yes, that “wow what was that&# helps when we make a presentation! [link] IT Rush I hate boring slides either but doesn’t know how to come up with a good one. looks like prezi is the answer to my questions. Anonymous I really like Prezi but i’ve hit a major stumbling block with it. I started using it a few months ago and was so impressed that I managed to convince my manager to buy a Pro License. As we started building more Prezis and at one point we decided that we wanted to start creating Prezis that contain confidential content. Due to the confidentiality of the content we did not want to store this on the Prezi servers. No problem, we could use Prezi Desktop as we had a Pro License. Our problems started when we wanted to share the Prezi with other people inside our organisation. The easiest way to do this would have been to embed it on one of our Intranet pages. However Prezi will not allow you to export your content in a format that allows you to do this. Despite asking this question several times on Prezi’s Support pages, and seeing the same question asked by many others, we have yet to get a reply from Prezi. The result is that my manager has now lost patience and is not going to renew the Pro License next year. As it stands Prezi is no longer an option for us, Such a shame. [link] Aoomall He seemed very good [link] [link] Aoomall He( [link] ) seemed very good [link] Remi Online i don’t know what to say but a lot of people use power point Caitlin Keynote. It’s what you need to make presentations look great. Steve Jobs uses it. And your iPhone and iPad can be used as remote controls and pointers. From personal experience, the best presentations have little to no text and big, meaningful images. You should talk and let the deck be a backdrop. A presentation with lots of text isn’t a presentation, it’s a pitch book. Anonymous I’m HOOKED! Now I need to “diplomatically&# suggest this to some people I know without implying that their presentations stink. blog comments powered by Disqus Search Lijit Search About Robert Robert Scoble is an employee of Rackspace , which can help you with all your hosting needs. He is chief troublemaker in the building43 community of Internet fanatics. You can reach Robert via his cell phone at +1-425-205-1921 or email at scobleizer@gmail.com. Visit Roberts Google Profile to see his Calendar, etc. All opinions you read here are Scobles own and are not necessarily those of Rackspace. Archives Select Month December 2010 November 2010 October 2010 September 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 November 2007 October 2007 September 2007 August 2007 July 2007 June 2007 May 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 January 2007 December 2006 November 2006 October 2006 September 2006 August 2006 July 2006 June 2006 May 2006 April 2006 March 2006 February 2006 January 2006 December 2005 November 2005 October 2005 Return to top of page Copyright © 2010 · Genesis Theme Framework by StudioPress · WordPress · Log in. ppt powerpoint presentation publicspeaking speaking

2010 285

Niche Marketing - "Specials" on the Menu

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

Published in 2005, it still ranks in the top 100,000 of books listed on Amazon. It's been the reality in many types of professional services for decades: the movement to niche expertise. Generalists drifted to the bottom of the food chain.

2019 52

Commencement Speeches - Replace Them

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

Those exceptions include Steve Jobs' talk at Stanford in 2005, It's time to replace the commencement speech. Politico points out the many of the commencement speeches by big political players such as Elizabeth Warren and Terry McAuliffe have been  banal. 

A great resource for presenters–Indezine.com

PowerPoint Tips

Since it was a small site, it worked — but by 2005, the site was huge and I knew that things had to change. I want to share with you a great resource for presenters– Indezine.com.

2011 216

Law Firms Moving into Reputation Restoration Space

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

  As a legal blogger since 2005, I receive those communications regularly. The earnest tone, cautious wording, and extensive length: That's the standard MO of law firms around the world emailing me a letter requesting that I delete a post about their client.

2019 52

Conde Nast Continues to Scramble, But Frantic Moves Will Be W/O Bob Sauerberg

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

With Conde Nast since 2005, he will only remain until a global chief is hired. Conde Nast: Can the once glossy print empire survive digital everything? All we see is scrambling. The latest frantic move, following the axing of print Glamour, is the combining of the U.S.

2018 56

A fascinating look at the history of aspect ratios

Presentation Zen

There is even a discussion of the Golden Mean and rule of thirds which I talked about in 2005 in this post From Wabi-Sabi to Golden Mean and here in From Golden Mean to Rule of Thirds.

2013 105

Tech & Ideology - Conservative Peter Thiel Departing Silicon Valley

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

He had been serving there since 2005. Former practicing lawyer and currently a successful venture capitalist - Peter Thiel - has been one of the few conservatives in Silicon Valley. The majority of the prominent players there had fundraised for Hillary Clinton.

Blogging: When life intervenes

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

" That's what I told my blogging coach Paul Chaney back in 2005, after he helped me get this site up and running.    Since 2005, I have fallen apart when, well, life intervened and I couldn't blog as much as I wanted.  "I'd rather be blogging."

2013 52

Edward Tufte on Data, Analysis, & Truth

Presentation Zen

I've talked about Tufte in my own books and on this website going back to at least this post in 2005. Edward Tufte is a leading expert in the data analysis and data visualization space.

You Don’t Know Dick!

Manner of Speaking

It is the 4 August 2005 Keynote Address that Hardt gave at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention in Portland, Oregon. Ahem … I am referring to Dick Clarence Hardt , founder and CEO of Sxip Identity and a big proponent of Identity 2.0.

2011 199

Ronan Farrow, et al. - Being "Threatened" BigBrand Builder

Jane Genova: Speechwriter - Ghostwriter

  When I was blogging the Rhode Island lead paint trial (November 2005 - February 2006), I received an email threat to stop mentioning a judge in Pennsylvania. Ronan Farrow has embraced investigative journalism.

2017 52

Two must-see college graduation speeches

Presentation Zen

The 2005 graduation speech by Steve Jobs garnered a lot of attention at the time, and is still talked about today, having been downloaded millions of times. It's graduation time in many parts of the world , and that means long ceremonies and a lot of speeches.