Communication Strategies: How to avoid sexist talk

The Communication Blog

Institutional sexism, on the other hand, results from customs and practices that discriminate against people because of their gender. Clear examples in business and industry are the widespread practice of paying women less than men for the same job and the discrimination against women in the upper levels of management. Lady is negatively evaluated by many because it connotes the stereotype of the prim and proper woman.

2011 116

5 ways to stop repeating the same mistakes

Speak Schmeak

If you want to grow as a speaker, you have to keep practicing and you have to keep speaking to a variety of groups. But you also have to evaluate yourself honestly and find ways to build on the skills you already have and keep improving, or else you will stagnate.

2009 158

Speaking Science: Why do I blush at the start of a speech?

The Eloquent Woman

In a 2011 study by de Jong and others, for instance, the researchers asked participants to practice cognitive behavioral therapy techniques over seven sessions as a potential way to reduce their fear of blushing.

2017 71

Three bad handshakes to avoid

Speak Schmeak

We found that men had firmer handshakes than women did, on average, but we also found that women who had firm handshakes tended to be evaluated as positively as men are. If you don't know what kind of handshake you have, ask some friends to practice with you.

2010 141

Three bad handshakes to avoid

Speak Schmeak

We found that men had firmer handshakes than women did, on average, but we also found that women who had firm handshakes tended to be evaluated as positively as men are. If you don't know what kind of handshake you have, ask some friends to practice with you. Download audio here.

2010 130

Communication Strategies: Listening Choices

The Communication Blog

Listening involves receiving, understanding, remembering, evaluating, and responding to what a person means as well as what a person is feeling. Your attitudes may lead you to distort messages—to block out positive messages about a foe and negative messages about a friend. Only after you’ve fully understood the relevant messages should you evaluate or judge. Avoid both positive and negative evaluation until you have a reasonably complete understanding.